21 Gravitational Fields

This page covers the gravitational fields section of the course.  Some people find this section very tricky. You must learn the formulae a and what each one means very carefully before you try and do the problems. They are so similar it gets a bit confusing. However, just learn each one carefully and make a definitions sheet. Then it will be clear!  Also potential energy and gravitational potential are not the same thing!

Resources

 

21 Grav Fields

21 Grav Fields Student booklet

A2 Gravitational Fields Timed Assessment

Advancing Physics Extracts for Gravitational Forces

Grav Potential Exam Q

HW Grav and Elec Fields Long Answer

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/grav.html 

 

Galileo's Famous Gravity Experiment | Brian Cox | BBC Two

You probably know that two objects dropped in a vacuum fall at the same rate, no matter the mass of each item. If you’ve never seen a demonstration of this, then you really should, because it’s incredible to watch.

Here is perhaps the perfect example, brought to us by physicist Brian Cox. He checked out NASA’s Space Simulation Chamber located at the Space Power Facility in Ohio. With a volume of 22,653 cubic meters, it’s the largest vacuum chamber in the world.

In this hypnotizing clip from the BBC, Cox drops a bowling ball and a feather together, first in normal conditions, and then after virtually all the air has been sucked out of the chamber. We know what happens, but that doesn’t stop it from being awesome, especially with the team’s ecstatic faces.

full-length experiment: https://youtu.be/E43-CfukEgs

Credit: iflscience, BBC Two
Retouch: Binh Pham
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